Shared Values

1.) The British, American and Japanese Similarities.

When I lived in Japan I was exposed to the far eastern reaches of British influence. The Japanese were infatuated with the English. The English were capitalist progresses who, without attempted Japanese imperialism or participation in bombing Japan, seemed like a benevolent people to emulate. The Japanese borrowed many customs from the British during the 1800 hundreds.  You need look no further for the cultural sharing between the Japanese and British than the Japanese word for tuxedo. In Japanese the word for tuxedo is “Sebiro” which is a Japanese attempt to say “Civil Row” a famous suit tailoring street in 1800’s London. Basically this highlights that when the Japanese chose to modernize they saw of the western powers the greatest similarity to themselves in the British.

Questions

Japan Britain America
Island nation? Yes Yes No
Space/resource conscience? Yes Yes No
Had a feudal system? Yes Yes No
Constitutional monarchy Yes Yes No
Warrior class/culture Yes Yes No
Decimated during WWII Yes Yes No
Socialized public works/services. Yes Yes No
Hereditary nobility /Classism Yes Yes No
Imperial history Yes Yes No
Social harmony YES Yes Not really.

Japanese affinity for the British has lasted to presentday post- industrial Japan. For these reasons I was very keen to come to Britain. I felt a connection to my study of Japan. I have a distinct memory of my host brother standing in front of me and saying that, “ I could live in England, because we view the world the same.”  His comment intrigued me for in a vague way he was saying that Americans do not share some of the source cultural values that the British share with the Japanese. Although from these pointed questions in the chart above it seems as though America is the odd man out in cultural connection to Britain, this is not entirely the case because America and Britain do share the most vital cultural connection; The history and gravity of the Western tradition.

Myself and Pat Pereira

Myself and Pat Pereira

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